What Do I Do if the Other Side Files a Writ of Certiorari, Prohibition, or Mandamus in Florida Cases?

Writs of Certiorari, Writs of Mandamus, and Writs of Prohibition are three different ways a party in Florida state court litigation can seek appellate court intervention even though the judge has not made a final decision. If the other side seeks one of these writs from the appellate court, what do you need to do to protect yourself?

No Response Required — at First

The party who files a petition for a writ is referred to in the appellate court as the Petitioner, and the party who won the trial court victory is referred to in the appellate court is called the Respondent. But in most cases, a Respondent is neither required nor allowed to respond to the Petition. A response is only allowed if ordered by the appellate court. The appellate court will first review the petition and decide whether it needs or wants a response. Florida Rule of Appellate Procedure Rule 9.100(h) states that if the Court believes the petition “demonstrates a preliminary basis for relief,” the Court will issue an “order to show cause” asking the Respondent to explain why relief should not be granted. The Court could also instead direct the Respondent to file a response. Either order will state a deadline for the Respondent to respond.

Do I Need Appellate Counsel?

It is a good idea to consult with appellate counsel if the other side files a writ. Appellate counsel can help in several ways. First, appellate counsel can provide an initial assessment of how likely the appellate court is to request a response. Second, appellate counsel can be at the ready in case the appellate court does order a response. The Court will set a deadline, and depending on how urgent the issues in the petition are, the deadline might be quite fast. Bringing appellate counsel on board as soon as the writ is filed can help ensure that you are ready to respond quickly if ordered. Third, if a response is ordered, appellate counsel is generally much more familiar with the procedural and jurisdictional quirks of these rare writs, and will often be in a better position to show the appellate court why the writ should not be granted based on appellate counsel’s wider experience in appellate standards of review. And finally, separate appellate counsel can allow your trial counsel to stay focused on the main litigation, which is most likely moving forward even though the writ is pending.

If you are on the receiving end of an extraordinary writ — whether it is a writ of certiorari, a writ of mandamus, or a writ of prohibition, consider engaging appellate counsel for a substantive consultation and/or to appear on your behalf in the appellate court. If we can help, feel free to contact us at 813-778-5161 or fill out our intake form here to initiate scheduling a consultation.

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