At this Morning’s State of the Second DCA CLE, Clerk Mary Beth Kuenzel announced a big and imminent change in the way that Court will be processing changes: as soon as March 1st, the Court will have transitioned to the eDCA filing system, and away from the Florida Court’s Portal. What does this mean for practitioners? If you are used to practicing in other DCAs, this transition won’t be too difficult, but for folks who only know the Portal, there will be some adjustment needed.

Sign Up Early. Watch the Clerk’s Website for the chance to sign up for eDCA in the next week. You’ll want to get your registration processed before it goes live and you need to file. You need a separate login for each District’s eDCA system.

Be Ready to Effectuate Separate Service. While eDCA provides “Case Mail” as soon as something is filed, that does not count as Service under Florida Rule of Judicial Administration Rule 2.516. You have to go back to sending a separate email for service.

Instant Orders. What we give up with service, we’ll get back tenfold by getting Court orders and opinions by email instead of U.S. Mail. This will save the Clerk more than $50,000 a year in postage, and save attorneys a lot of hassle, too.

Record on Demand. With eDCA, attorneys of record can download from the docket any DCA filing, including the Record on Appeal once transmitted. No more need for the FTP work around, which worked, but was time intensive for Court staff.

Briefs on Demand. Registrants to the system will also be able to pull briefs in cases where they are NOT counsel of record. Pretty handy if you are briefing the same issue!

Portal for Payment. The Second District will still be on the portal for one reason — to accept payment of filing fees. If you pay through the portal, plan to upload a simple payment transmittal letter, and ONLY a payment transmittal letter. Any other document or pleading will be kicked.

The hope is that the portal will be ready to work with the DCA internal docketing systems by Spring of 2018, and at that point, all of them will switch to the portal. But for now, all DCAs will require separate eDCA login.

Editor’s Note: We were in such a rush to get out this news, we forgot to mention the payment issue. This article is updated to reflect that information!

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Hon. Linda Ann Wells

Hon. Linda Ann Wells

Third District Court of Appeal Judge Linda Ann Wells has announced her retirement effective March 31, 2017. Judge Wells, who served as the Court’s first female chief judge, has reached the mandatory retirement age. The Judicial Nominating Commission will no doubt be tapped shortly to identify and recommend to the governor a slate of possible appointees.

In the meantime, Governor Scott has appointed Circuit Judge Robert J. Luck to fill the Third District Court vacancy created by the January 3 retirement of Judge Frank Shepherd. Judge Shepherd had also hit the mandatory retirement age. Judge Luck is currently a circuit civil judge for the Eleventh Judicial Circuit. Congratulations Judge Luck!

Hon. Robert J. Luck

Hon. Robert J. Luck

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In an appellate victory for DPW Legal, the Second District Court of Appeal issued an opinion today reaffirming that banks seeking to foreclose on homes must strictly adhere to evidentiary rules governing negotiable instruments and business records.

In Heller v. Bank of America NA, No. 2D14-3530 (Fla. 2d DCA. Jan. 27, 2017) [.pdf], the Bank at a foreclosure trial offered into evidence a copy of the note, rather than the original note, with its counsel asserting that the original had been recently filed with the court clerk. The trial court admitted the copy over defense counsel’s objection, citing the Best Evidence Rule, Section 90.953, Florida Statutes. The Bank also admitted into evidence (again over the homeowner’s objections) testimony of its representative based not on personal knowledge, but on his review of business records that were not in evidence or elsewhere in the court file.

DPW Legal attorney Dineen Pashoukos Wasylik argued on appeal that both rulings were abuses of discretion and an erroneous interpretation of the evidence code, and the Second District agreed. First, the Court held that Section 90.953 of the Florida Evidence Code requires any party seeking to enforce a negotiable instrument—such as the promissory note involved here—to produce and surrender the original of the instrument to the court. The Court rejected the Bank’s argument that the trial court was entitled to rely upon counsel’s assertions that the original had been filed with the clerk. The Court reaffirmed the longstanding tenet of law that a trial court may not “rely on an unsworn statement of counsel to make a factual determination.”

Second, the Court held that the bank’s witness’s testimony based on purported “business records” not otherwise in the record was inadmissible hearsay. The testimony, not based on personal knowledge, should have been disallowed absent the business records actually having been admitted into evidence. Given these evidentiary errors, leaving insufficient admissible evidence to support the judgment on appeal, the Second District reversed the judgment and remanded for new trial.

Thanks to attorney Michael Alex Wasylik for his able representation of the client at trial. Reading the opinion, it is clear that Mike’s strong efforts to frame the best evidence rule issue, both at the pleading stage and at trial, were the key to our success on appeal. (For full disclosure, Mike also happens to be Dineen’s husband!).

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